Math: Elementary – beaverton.k12.or.us

DISTRICT HOME
The Beaverton School District includes 34 elementary schools, nine middle schools, six high schools, five option schools, 19 option programs and two charter schools. We have more than 39,000 students and nearly 4,500 staff members.
The Beaverton School Board has seven elected community members who serve four-year terms.  They are volunteers. Though candidates are nominated from the Board Zone they live in, voters in the District elect them at-large.  Each Board member has several school assignments that may or may not be in their zone. 
 
DISTRICT HOME
The ability to think and communicate mathematically is essential to becoming a successful and productive member of our dynamic global society. To prepare our students, they must develop the skills to:
If we are to meet this challenge, we must provide students with multiple opportunities to engage with a variety of problem solving tasks that reflect the diverse backgrounds, abilities, and experiences of each student. Students should explore and collaborate on rich problems with multiple entry points and multiple paths to a solution that challenges them. Students should be encouraged to work through their thinking and computations in order for them to recognize the patterns, significance, and relevance of the true nature of mathematics. Developing number sense, estimation, and computation skills will create students who are more efficient in their problem solving skills.
We must provide all students with a rigorous, accessible, and challenging curriculum that will develop critical thinkers and prepare them for post‐secondary, career, and life success.   This will require a combination of materials and the use of multiple instructional strategies, including evidence‐based intervention and extension methods to successfully reach all children. Proficiency on learning targets, mathematical practices, and ongoing assessment of student  progress will inform next steps for instruction.
 
Dreambox was chosen to complement our adoption of Math Workshop and the CFLM/Fosnot units.  Dreambox is an adaptive online math program that teaches students in a way that conceptually matches the work teachers are doing in workshop.  Students are assigned work that best meets what they need that helps to fill any conceptual holes that they may have. This is especially beneficial when work students may need is not being taught as part of the current unit.  Unlike other online math programs, Dreambox does not reward students for quick, correct answers. Instead, it supports students in having “productive struggle” to build conceptual understanding.
 
 
There is not specific district mandated homework for math.  Teachers choose homework that best fits what they are working on in the classroom.  We know for ELA that reading at home every day is crucial in growing readers. Because the research about math homework does not strongly correlate with student achievement, it’s possible that your child’s teacher will send home homework that looks different than homework we were accustomed to when we were students.  The purpose of homework is to give students a chance to practice what they have learned and to share their learning with their parents. You may see:
A weekly open-ended inquiry problem that your child has to write a journal about and share their strategies with you
Dreambox practice (make sure students are doing this on their own without your help)
SeeSaw games and activities students are doing in class that they can practice at home
A real world reflection question for the week so that kids are looking for connections to math at home
 
 
The best way to support math at home is by playing games with your child!  Games like Yahtzee, War, and Bingo can all help students to build number sense, while games like Blokus, Set, Qwirkle, and Memory can build spatial reasoning and geometric recognition.  Your child will likely also play other games at school that build fact fluency. Ask your child’s teacher if any of those games are appropriate for practice at home. If your child is practicing fact fluency at home, ask them how they figured out the answers to push them to prove their thinking using strategies.  To be fluent, students should be efficient (not necessarily fast), accurate, and flexible in their thinking.  
 
 
There are a few ways to see what your child is doing at home.  Dreambox is a great tool for extra practice at home because it aligns with the strategies students are learning at school.  We recommend that parents watch their child doing some of the lessons to get a better idea of what they are working on. However, please do not help your child with Dreambox as it is an adaptive program that adjusts the level to what students need.  When parents help their child on Dreambox it often becomes too hard for that student to do on their own. Students should not use paper and pencil to solve when working on Dreambox because the program gives them digital tools to use instead. 
 
Another way to see what strategies your child is doing is to use math tasks from Illustrative Math.  These problems are open-ended and allow for different ways of thinking. Instead of telling your child how to do the problems, use conferring questions to support them and learn more about their thinking. 
Kindergarten
1st Grade
2nd Grade
3rd Grade
4th Grade
5th Grade
ALT 1 – I can count to 100 by ones. 
ALT 2 – I can count to 100 by tens. 
ALT 3 – I can write the numbers that represent a given number of objects from zero to twenty.
ALT 4 – I can use counting strategies to determine the number of objects and I can understand the relationship between numbers and quantities.
ALT 5 – I can compare sets of groups of objects to tell more, less, or equal to.
ALT 6 -I can show addition as putting together and adding to -and- subtraction as taking apart and taking from
ALT 7 – I can use mental strategies to fluently and accurately add and subtract within 5. 
ALT 8 – I can use place value to find the tens and ones of the numbers 11-19.
ALT 9 – I can describe measurable attributes of an object and directly compare 2 objects with measurable attributes.
ALT 10 – I can classify objects into categories and sort and count objects into a specified category.
ALT 11 – I can identify and describe shapes (two- and three-dimensional.) Shapes include: squares, circles, triangles, rectangles, hexagons, cubes, cones, cylinders, and spheres.
ALT 12 – I can analyze, compare, and compose two- and three-dimensional shapes.
 
MP 1 – Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
MP 2 – Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
MP 3 – Construct viable arguments & critique the reasoning of others.
MP 4 – Model with mathematics.
MP 5 – Use appropriate tools strategically.
MP 6 – Attend to precision.
MP 7- Look for and make use of structure.
MP 8 – Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.
ALT 1 – I can learn, represent and solve problems involving addition and subtraction and I understand the relationship between them.
ALT 2 – I can add and subtract fluently up to 10. 
ALT 3 – I can count, read, and write to 120 starting at any number less than 120.
ALT 4 – I understand place value up to two digit numbers and can compare within 100.
ALT 5 – I use place value understanding and properties of operations to add and subtract with 100.
ALT 6 – I can measure the lengths of objects and name the length unit.
ALT 7 – I can tell and write time.
ALT 8 – I can organize, represent, and interpret data.
ALT 9 – I can reason with shapes and their attributes.
 
MP 1 – Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
MP 2 – Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
MP 3 – Construct viable arguments & critique the reasoning of others.
MP 4 – Model with mathematics.
MP 5 – Use appropriate tools strategically.
MP 6 – Attend to precision.
MP 7- Look for and make use of structure.
MP 8 – Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.
ALT 1 – I can add and subtract using place value strategies.
ALT 2 – I can use mental math strategies to fluently add and subtract within 20.
ALT 3 – I can work with equal groups of objects to gain foundations for multiplication.
ALT 4 – I understand place value and can compare two three-digit numbers.
ALT 5 – I can measure and estimate lengths using standard and metric systems.
ALT 6 – I can tell and write time to the nearest 5 minutes.
ALT 7 – I can solve word problems involving dollars and cents.
ALT 8 – I can represent and interpret data.
ALT 9 – I can reason with shapes and their attributes.
 
MP 1 – Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
MP 2 – Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
MP 3 – Construct viable arguments & critique the reasoning of others.
MP 4 – Model with mathematics.
MP 5 – Use appropriate tools strategically.
MP 6 – Attend to precision.
MP 7- Look for and make use of structure.
MP 8 – Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.
ALT 1 – I can represent and solve problems involving multiplication and division.
ALT 2 – I can understand properties of operations and the relationship between multiplication and division.
ALT 3 – I can fluently multiply and divide within 100.
ALT 4 – I can fluently add and subtract within 1,000.
ALT 5 – I can describe and represent fractions as equal parts of a whole or set, compare fractions, and identify equivalent fractions.
ALT 6 – I can solve problems involving measurement and estimation of intervals of time.
ALT 7 – I can solve problems involving measurement and estimation of liquid volumes and masses of objects.
ALT 8 – I can represent and interpret data.
ALT 9 – I can measure the area of a rectilinear shape.
ALT 10 – I can find the perimeter of different polygons.
ALT 11 – I can reason with shapes and their attributes.
 
MP 1 – Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
MP 2 – Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
MP 3 – Construct viable arguments & critique the reasoning of others.
MP 4 – Model with mathematics.
MP 5 – Use appropriate tools strategically.
MP 6 – Attend to precision.
MP 7- Look for and make use of structure.
ALT 1 – I can use multi-digit addition and subtraction to solve problems.
ALT 2 – I can use multi-digit multiplication and division to solve problems.
ALT 3 – I can apply my understanding of factors and multiples.
ALT 4 – I can create and analyze patterns with unknown rules.
ALT 5 – I can read, write, and compare numbers with place value to a million.
ALT 6 – I can add, subtract, order and compare fractions and decimals and multiply fractions by whole numbers.
ALT 7 – I can solve problems involving measurement and measurement conversions, including distance, time, volume, mass and money.
ALT 8 – I can understand the concepts of angles, and I can accurately measure angles.
ALT 9 – I can draw and identify lines and angles, and classify shapes by properties of their lines and angles.
 
MP 1 – Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
MP 2 – Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
MP 3 – Construct viable arguments & critique the reasoning of others.
MP 4 – Model with mathematics.
MP 5 – Use appropriate tools strategically.
MP 6 – Attend to precision.
MP 7 – Look for and make use of structure.
ALT 1 – I can write and interpret numerical expressions.
ALT 2 – I can analyze patterns and relationships and graph points on a coordinate plane to solve problems.
ALT 3 – I can understand the place value system.
ALT 4 – I can perform operations to fluently solve problems with multi-digit whole numbers.
ALT 5 – I can perform operations to fluently solve problems involving decimals to the hundredths place.
ALT 6 – I can fluently add and subtract fractions.
ALT 7 – I can multiply and divide fractions (unit fraction divided by whole numbers and whole numbers divided by unit fractions).
ALT 8 – I can understand and apply concepts of volume.
ALT 9 – I can classify two-dimensional figures into categories based on their properties.
 
MP 1 – Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
MP 2 – Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
MP 3 – Construct viable arguments & critique the reasoning of others.
MP 4 – Model with mathematics.
MP 5 – Use appropriate tools strategically.
MP 6 – Attend to precision.
MP 7- Look for and make use of structure.
The current Math curriculum was adopted by the School Board on April 4, 2017.  The adoption process followed the procedures outlined in the Instructional Materials Selection Administrative Regulation II/IIA-AR.
To learn more about the Math curriculum adoption, please visit the Math Curriculum Project Team page.
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